Warning: Use of undefined constant ‘WP_DEBUG_LOG’ - assumed '‘WP_DEBUG_LOG’' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/level4po/public_html/recoveringfromrecovery.com/wp-config.php on line 73

Warning: Use of undefined constant ‘WP_DEBUG_DISPLAY’ - assumed '‘WP_DEBUG_DISPLAY’' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/level4po/public_html/recoveringfromrecovery.com/wp-config.php on line 74
Mindfulness – Recovering-from-Recovery https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com An Alcoholism and Addiction recovery blog. Fri, 02 Jun 2017 07:39:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 61103246 Jay https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/jay/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=jay https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/jay/#respond Sat, 03 Dec 2016 12:10:33 +0000 https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/?p=11239 Jay Jay has very kindly written this piece for the site about his experiences in recovery. Many of his experiences are similar to mine and I hope we soon have a chance to do a podcast on the subject. I think this is a really great post and will hopefully encourage others to try this […]

The post Jay appeared first on Recovering-from-Recovery.

]]>
Jay

Jay has very kindly written this piece for the site about his experiences in recovery. Many of his experiences are similar to mine and I hope we soon have a chance to do a podcast on the subject. I think this is a really great post and will hopefully encourage others to try this path.

I had gone to traditional behavioral modification programs for most of my addiction. These are the places that break you down to build you up and strongly encourage you get a sponsor and do the steps. It felt as if the only way I would ever graduate the program was to give in and do the twelve steps. I had gone to a place that held you accountable through your roommate, and if you didn’t pray openly on your knees you would get in trouble for it. At this point I wanted to be sober and I thought that my reluctance was defiance. I was convinced that because I could not adapt, I was doomed to use again.

It wasn’t until I went through a holistic treatment center that I felt like I had any chance of staying clean. I had a lot of misconceptions about “alternative treatment,” from commercials I saw on television. I thought it was unfair that I would soak up the sunshine while the people in my life I had hurt would suffer through another New Jersey winter; cleaning up the mess I left yet again.

elevation-center_mentalhealth

Holistic treatment options are a rising trend among the recovery industry. They offer a bunch of other tools in either addition to or as a replacement of traditional twelve step treatment, holistic treatment is a much more explorative and much more open option and array of care. The center I went to had an animal rescue ranch in the back of their sober living. I got an opportunity to volunteer and help with the animals. For me, this was the first instance in quite some time where I didn’t feel worthless. Sometimes, I would sit near the horses and meditate. I didn’t want to be alone but I knew I needed to find peace, and this to me was finding what many people referred to as God.

We weren’t forced to go to meetings. They would bring Refuge Recovery meetings into the house every week where an outside speaker would come and share their experience getting clean through a Mindful based approach. Refuge Recovery is a Buddhist based model that emphasizes the importance of meditation as well as its own set of principles and inventory work. As a journey from within, Refuge encourages its members to dig deep inside of themselves, as well as build a Sangha, or community, in order to heal.

Once a week we would have a SMART meeting come in. SMART Recovery, whose acronym stands for Self Management And Recovery Training, was another method of a recovery group I didn’t hate to go to.

Smart offers its members the opportunity for harm reduction, as well as a practical way to approach each day with various tools and methods for growth. From journaling to sharing about your week and stresses, I felt apart of a group for the first time in quite a while. I wouldn’t say that this was necessary a switch flipped that rescued me from addiction, but it became one of the many tools I got to choose from in a regular basis.

Along with recovery groups, holistic treatment centers focus on health and nutrition, as well as exercise and healthy activities to add to the recovery routine. Many centers have basketball or tennis courts as a way to encourage their clients to become active as well as have fun and engage in leisure activities with one another to build and strengthen connections. These activities aren’t offered in lieu of therapy or assignments. They’re offered as a way to help the individual discover their interests once more. The therapeutic value of leisure activities is immense, and after a day of healing and process groups, these activities were the perfect way to raise endorphins and connect with other people on a lighter yet arguably deeper level than a traditional approach can offer. I began to feel as though I wasn’t alone. I played ping pong or shot the basketball around with some other people who were trying to stay clean, too.

Nutrition and health fall into the wellness category. The idea is that a healthy body is a happy body. This doesn’t mean strict diets and a rigorous exercise routine, it means a mindful approach to health and eating. In addition to looking good, eating healthy and exercising is a way to feel good. Many of us are either malnourished when we arrive in treatment or have been surviving off of junk food, or little to no food at all. Because of my failing liver health I was strongly encouraged to eat raw foods and a vegan diet for the first month I was there. I ended up eating vegan for almost a year because I felt such a difference in my mood and my energy level.

elevation-all-inclusive-care

When you eat healthy and exercise, your body returns to homeostasis or a balance of normalcy much quicker than when you eat junk food and don’t exercise. In the beginning of recovery, I found it essential to take care of myself. Things I took for granted like a good night of sleep became things that I craved, and through meditation, exercise, and eating healthier my sleep has improved immensely. Holistic treatment for me was a collaborative effort of different tools and methods that I got to custom fit my needs and wants. I was so burnt out on the twelve steps that I would have done anything if I thought it would help me to stay clean and find happiness.

If the twelve step approach hasn’t worked for you in the past, then try something new. There are options out there in holistic treatment or even non twelve step recovery meetings where likeminded people are waiting to meet you. The recovery world has changed quite a bit over the past 80 years, offering much more than it had previously. Search for what works for you and believe in yourself.

Taking a break from the twelve steps and their fellowships allowed me to get to a point of stability where I can sometimes go to meetings now and not hate it. I support my friends who speak or celebrate birthdays at AA and I stay for the entire meeting. I don’t feel as though I’m leaving the life boat, I feel as though I’m already on solid land and I’m going to be supportive of others who are finding their own path.

Whether it’s AA, a hospital detox, a Malibu Rehab, or kicking drugs on your parent’s couch, whatever means you have to stay clean will work if you believe in it. If you have the luxury that I had of choosing where to go, I strongly encourage a holistic treatment center or an alternative approach for anyone who might not have found any success in AA or traditional treatment. The world has changed quite a bit in 80 years, and recovery had begun to change with it. Follow your heart and believe in yourself; live the life you were meant to live clean and happy.

 

The post Jay appeared first on Recovering-from-Recovery.

]]>
https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/jay/feed/ 0 11239
Left For DeAAd. https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/left-for-deaad/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=left-for-deaad https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/left-for-deaad/#comments Wed, 20 Apr 2016 16:23:51 +0000 https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/?p=11079 Mindfulness Meditation in Recovery It is always great when people get in touch having read the site and identify with some of the things on it. It is even better when they want to write a piece for you! This is by Jay. I have used mindfulness a lot myself over the years and feel […]

The post Left For DeAAd. appeared first on Recovering-from-Recovery.

]]>
Mindfulness Meditation in Recovery
It is always great when people get in touch having read the site and identify with some of the things on it. It is even better when they want to write a piece for you! This is by Jay. I have used mindfulness a lot myself over the years and feel it has really helped me. It is great to see other people doing well using meditation as part of their day. Hopefully we will do a podcast about meditation in recovery soon.

Left For DeAAd.

My introduction to twelve step programs was at the age of 19, after a suicide attempt had landed me into a psych hospital. Heavy hearted and devastated by surviving and my inability to kill myself, I was loaded up with medicine and given strict instructions to follow up with an out-patient program. I did, and discovered that at the time, the only program offered with my school schedule was the night-time 35 years and up Chemical Dependency program. This was okay, I thought, I loved drugs and alcohol, but I didn’t necessarily want to quit. I would go for the psychiatrist and the free pizza, and they’d fix me.

Arriving my first day, stupid and clueless I sat in the circle of an aged to perfection concession of lies and resistance. I introduced myself as Jay, 19 and here for depression. “Aren’t you here because of alcohol? Didn’t you drink the night you tried— ended up in the hospital? You’re here because you’re an alcoholic.” The counselor broke the ice and there it was, there was my first time hearing the word alcoholic attached to my story. I of course tried to defend myself and had not an inkling of a clue that there were pages in the big book designed to ridicule folks like myself who were “only fooling themselves”– the dishonesty of an alcoholic is one beyond measure and all things Holy! The room erupted in laughter– egg headed ego-maniacal middle aged men unified in a relief in my misfortune. “Keep coming back!” One man in the group yelled in his hands with his head down, and then threw his head back and roared.

This is how things went for the three months of my out-patient. I went to meetings and even helped set them up, I spoke to folks outside of the meetings and smoked cigarettes– gave rides to those who couldn’t drive, and even shared openly about my feelings in my outpatient. But, my reluctance to get a sponsor or take the steps was the catalyst for my outpatient graduation recap. The room went around and one by one told me how I wasn’t finished, that they’d pray for me, and there would be a seat left for me in any meeting I decided to crawl back to– if i I were lucky enough to make it back.

These were the friendly faces I was introduced to the 12 steps by, and this was the proverbial taste left in my mouth after my first impression of a program I hated by default. For years following I did try to force myself out of desperation and ignorance to finish– oblivious to any alternative methods, brainwashed by the messages of “this is the only thing that works,” “last house on the block,” etc..

meditation

For over 7 years I had tried to do things the “AA way,” and failed each time after just a few months of abstinence. I began questioning the theory behind abstinence. I decided that I could take benzodiazepines because I was a heroin addict and it wasn’t my drug of choice. I also retreated into a program for Buddhist drug addicts founded on the principles of Buddhism and addiction as a form of suffering. I began to believe that I could get clean and stay clean without the help of a twelve step program. Unfortunately, I began cheeking my medication and taking it all at once with a mix of herbal enhancements to accentuate the calming sedating effects of the medicine I was taking. Within a month I was shooting heroin again and now shooting other drugs like Meth to mix with it. I found myself on the street, Sunset Blvd in Hollywood sleeping on the same stretch of sidewalk I would beg for money on.

Intuitively, a thought was planted within the confines of my suffering mind. The thought began to sprout slowly that the power to change was inside of myself. This didn’t mean that I had all of the answers, it simply meant that I didn’t actually need a program to dictate how to live my life if I didn’t believe in the program. The message behind AA was beautiful once, and I believe if I were alive in the 30’s during the beginning I would have been one to shake hands with James Burwell, the man who added “as we understood him,” next to the word God on the steps. This, this thought, this random fact that I had held onto found its usage in my new outlook and determination to get clean without AA. In fact, the program I managed to escape into was founded by a man who had gotten sober through AA and now helps folks to find other means of recovery, stating the focus of AA has become increasingly to shame and control the newcomer; in older times the men who suffered and women who suffered were embraced. These days are over, so my friend now says, and I tend to agree.

I found my way into a program, I kicked cold turkey on a psych ward floor, and began being embraced by the kind folks who owned the treatment center I was lucky enough to have been accepted into. They kept me for many months, they helped me find a job, and they allowed me to search for purpose and meaning in my life. I chose meditation and Buddhist principles.

The principles, the 8 fold path, the 4 noble truths, as elementary as they are to Buddhism began to help me see my life as an obstacle course I didn’t have the slightest idea how to navigate. It began to make sense in a less religious and more spiritually guided view-point. Meditation helped me to become mindful and sit through feelings of discomfort or wanting to flee from the slightest thing that went wrong. Over 13 months later, meditation has taken so many different forms in my life. My meditation is gardening; my meditation is music; my meditation is being with my girlfriend; my meditation is driving and acknowledging my small place in this universe; the ability to help as many around me as I am able to help. Sometimes I help people because I’m selfish and I want validation, but most times I’m helpful because I remember the way backs were turned on me when I needed somebody to hug me and tell me everything was going to be okay in spite of how I felt.

The idea of a god now is becoming more and more relevant in my meditations; the empty space that fills my eyes mixed with a sensation of peace I’m starting to find more and more frequently throughout my life. This feeling I could allow to be called God, if somebody so wanted, and not be offended or resistant. I’ve lost the opposition in even the word God. I’ve even lost my opposition to the steps and encourage people to experiment with AA or any other twelve step program, because my journey has been one for myself. It wasn’t always this way. There were many times I had gotten injured or sick this past year, had my heart broken or was let down in some way and thought about turning back to heroin. There’s a place I can reside in my mind that never really wavers if I practice meditating frequently.

I’ve been to one meeting in the past 6 months because somebody who was newly getting clean had asked me to take them to their very first one. I did. I didn’t object, I didn’t identify as an alcoholic or an addict, I identified as support. I was embraced respectfully as somebody who wouldn’t “turn.” I like meetings, in the sense that I like the idea of a community of people much like myself, the problem is that the likeminded ones are a needle in a haystack and its so important for me to find the other lost ones– the other ones who have a glimmer of hope that is extinguished within a rigid structure that was never intended to be so rigid. The old days– the glory days of offering your couch to somebody who was in need– of buying somebody a meal and telling them to return the next day because you loved them and you were them once. Those are the nostalgic feelings I feel when I think of the way AA was probably intended. I grieve those days as a lost dream I had maybe dreamt in a stream of dreams universal. But I also know that my own journey is my own journey, and I take refuge in the peace that I’ve found knowing that I’m allowed to walk my path the way I wish to walk it.

To summarize. My name is Jay, I’m 27 years old. I haven’t done heroin, any other drugs or alcohol in over 13 months. I meditate on a daily basis, sometimes guided, sometimes not guided, and I have a code that I live by that helps me to be a better person. I talk about my feelings to professionals and friends, I never trust a man who tells me how good of a person they are, and I encourage anybody anywhere to find a way of life that works for them, program related or personal quest, and to believe whole hearted that no matter how they decide to change their lives or find recovery, that it will work and they will be happy so long as they try their hardest to change. I changed my life without AA, and I beg you not to go back to the way you were living just because you hate the twelve step model. There are so many ways to get off drugs and stop drinking, you only need to find one for yourself.

Jay

The post Left For DeAAd. appeared first on Recovering-from-Recovery.

]]>
https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/left-for-deaad/feed/ 8 11079
Your Addiction Primer on Mindfulness and Loving Kindness By Stanton Peele https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/your-addiction-primer-on-mindfulness-and-loving-kindness/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=your-addiction-primer-on-mindfulness-and-loving-kindness https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/your-addiction-primer-on-mindfulness-and-loving-kindness/#comments Tue, 26 Jan 2016 19:47:54 +0000 https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/?p=11002 I’m really happy that Stanton Peele has written a piece for my site about Loving Kindness. Stanton Peele’s books have really helped me, including his newest one (with Ilse Thompson, whose work I also know and respect), Recover! An Empowering Program to Help You Stop Thinking Like an Addict and Reclaim Your Life.  Stanton Peele […]

The post Your Addiction Primer on Mindfulness and Loving Kindness By Stanton Peele appeared first on Recovering-from-Recovery.

]]>
Stanton Peele Life Process ProgramI’m really happy that Stanton Peele has written a piece for my site about Loving Kindness.

Stanton Peele’s books have really helped me, including his newest one (with Ilse Thompson, whose work I also know and respect), Recover! An Empowering Program to Help You Stop Thinking Like an Addict and Reclaim Your Life.  Stanton Peele has an on-line self-help program, The Life Process Program, lifeprocessprogram.com, which I and others find to be an extremely good value. Here is the piece Stanton has kindly written for me about Loving Kindness and Mindfulness.

Your Addiction Primer on Mindfulness and Loving Kindness

In the Life Process Program we have created an online addiction treatment program that incorporates cognitive therapy and Buddhist practices.  Chief among these practices are Mindfulness and Loving Kindness.

Mindfulness has become a new buzzword.  But, hopefully, coming to grips with its meaning can help us all, whether currently addicted or not, to fight addiction.  In psychology, per Ellen Langer, mindfulness refers to being aware of the factors in your environment that drive your behaviour.  For example, you may drink excessively when you are anxious, or when you hang out at a bar with a particular group of people.

In Buddhism, mindfulness means living in the here and now.  My friend Johann Hari (who has written the anti-addiction-as-disease best seller, Chasing the Scream) defines addiction as anything that blocks us from living in the here and now.

Both of these concepts of mindfulness give us important ways to combat addiction or alcoholism.  They make us alert to, and welcoming of, the world around us.  In Ilse’s and my anti-addiction program, which we abbreviate as PERFECT, the “P” is for “pause.” Mindfulness allows you to halt your headlong rush towards your addiction that can overtake you at bad moments.

Mindfulness is thus the ability to control your own thinking and behaviour in line with your values.  Of course, it may take some effort on your part—and some moments in the sun—for you to clarify or rediscover your best self.  According to Buddhism, we all possess such “perfection.”  We all belong to, and in, this world.  Do you feel that way?  We teach you ways of meditating about this state of perfection, a birth right for every human being.

In this self-acceptance, we come to the Buddhist practice of Loving Kindness, which is compassion towards others, and at the same times towards oneself.  Ilse Thompson and I find that Loving Kindness opposes the 12 steps (even though a number of hard-working authors try to combine the two philosophies).

Consider steps 4-6:

4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.

5. Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.

6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.

Feeling very uplifted around now?  AA can provide good support for people, or it can undermine them.  You’ll have to be the judge of that for yourself.  But these steps don’t represent a Buddhist path.  They are rather a Western religious tradition of guilt, self-blame, and shame that we feel is a prod to addiction, and not a remedy.

Of course, keying into Loving Kindness towards ourselves is not a pass to indulge in behaviour that harms ourselves and others, one that offers us a “get-out-of-jail-free” Monopoly card.  It is rather a way of relaxing our judgments about ourselves that paradoxically permits us to act more in line with our positive values.

For example, Ilse and I write in of Recover! An Empowering Program to Help You Stop Thinking Like an Addict and Reclaim Your Life:

Self-control research has discovered that self-criticism reduces self-control.  Rather, self-acceptance and forgiveness—especially in the face of stress and failure—enhance people’s capacity for changing negative behaviors.
Consider a study of students who procrastinate, then beat themselves up for having done so. The very act of self-recrimination for procrastinating makes it more likely that they will do so again before future exams. The
harder the students were on themselves, the greater this effect.

Instead, “forgiveness, not guilt, increases accountability . . . taking a self-compassionate point of view on a personal failure makes people more likely to take personal responsibility for the failure than when they take a self-critical point of view. They also are more willing to receive feedback and advice from others, and more likely to learn from the experience.” (This last quote is from Kelly McGonigal, The Willpower Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What You Can Do to Get More of It.)

Recently, my friend psychiatrist Sally Satel wrote for the New York Times, “Can Shame be Useful.”  Sally finds that it can be, since people weigh their negative feelings when they decide to quit an addiction. I endorse entirely Sally’s understanding of people’s possibilities for self-change, rather than of being caught in an irresistible biological force field, the vision promoted by the “chronic brain disease” meme.

But, for Ilse and I, adding a burden of shame weighs down our efforts at, and ability to, change.

Sally, for instance, doesn’t want drugs legalized since, after all, going to jail can be one motivation to quit a drug habit.  For Ilse and me, imprisonment, or its threat, is not a good impetus for change.  As Ilse wrote to me: “That seems like a wrecking-ball (hitting bottom) approach to facilitating people’s recognition of how their behavior is in conflict with their priorities, designed to elicit the most intractable shame and social consequences.”

My good friend, Tom Horvath, president of SMART Recovery, and founder of SEATA (the Self-Empowering Addiction Treatment Association), put it succinctly: “We can use shame therapeutically if it exists, but agreed, let’s not try to create it!”

As Ilse added, “I have a lot of confidence in people’s ability to hate themselves without resorting to ruining their lives as a means of helping them see that their choices are undermining their values.”

For me, putting people in jail to make them realize they’d be better off unaddicted is like depriving them of their homes since homelessness also makes them aware that addiction is bad for them.

Following the practice of Loving Kindness towards ourselves is to pursue a different path to recovery.

Stanton Peele, Ph.D., J.D., is the author (with Ilse Thompson) of Recover! An Empowering Program to Help You Stop Thinking Like an Addict and Reclaim Your Life.. His Life Process Program is available online.

 

The post Your Addiction Primer on Mindfulness and Loving Kindness By Stanton Peele appeared first on Recovering-from-Recovery.

]]>
https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/your-addiction-primer-on-mindfulness-and-loving-kindness/feed/ 1 11002
NLP in recovery from Alcoholism and Addiction https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/nlp-recovery-alcoholism-addiction/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=nlp-recovery-alcoholism-addiction https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/nlp-recovery-alcoholism-addiction/#comments Sun, 26 Oct 2014 09:10:38 +0000 https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/?p=9432 NLP in recovery from Alcoholism and Addiction NLP or “Neuro Linguistc Programming” is something that I have meant to talk about for some time on the site, but have managed to write anything untill now. I did mention it is passing before and have seen quite a lot about it mentioned on sites such as Soberistas, […]

The post NLP in recovery from Alcoholism and Addiction appeared first on Recovering-from-Recovery.

]]>
Richard Bandler

NLP in recovery from Alcoholism and Addiction

NLP or “Neuro Linguistc Programming” is something that I have meant to talk about for some time on the site, but have managed to write anything untill now. I did mention it is passing before and have seen quite a lot about it mentioned on sites such as Soberistas, where people generally report a positive outcome. I also got flamed for mentioning online before, so as usual with anything that is to do with recovery from addiction, it divides opinion.

I am certainly not a life coach and have not formally learnt NLP. I have read some of the books, including those by Richard Bandler and Paul McKenna and have made use of resources such as the hypnotic cd’s when I was giving up smoking and also as ways of bringing some peace and quiet to a busy day. I found that many of the ideas presented in the material, had their roots in practices such as mindfulness and were linked to CBT techniques. Overall I feel that these methods have helped me, and I have not smoked since I followed Paul McKenna’s method and actually found it a much easier approach than the many other methods that I have used.

So far I seem to be giving NLP a thumbs up, but I do feel there is a bad side to it as well. Pretty much anybody can become and NLP practitioner and life coach after attending a few courses. NLP works like a pyramid scheme in that people who are looking for a solution for their problems, get involved with NLP and then take the course and pass it onto others by teaching them. Some are better than others! My partner was given appalling advice by one of her friends who is an NLP convert.

NLP is self-help and goal based which can be a great thing, but it is not therapy. Some may feel more comfortable going to see an NLP friend and discussing issues rather than seeing somebody with proper medical qualifications who has studied for years. The outcome can be disastrous is poor advice is given, by somebody who learnt NLP because they were unstable themself.

I think that NLP has some good ideas and there is certainly common ground between it and other methods of self empowerment such as CBT. However, I do feel that the anti psychiatrist stance by people such as Bandler in the early days have caused it to be have a lack of credibility with many in the medical field, and the fact that the pyramid system leads to a similar type of faith in the methods, as the irrational 12 step AA solution in addiction recovery and you can see where problems can occur.

I still feel that these books and methods can have some value. I went through a period in recovery after about 18 months when I really started to feel emotions and I also had quite a lot of intrusive thoughts. I had got through the craving stage of my recovery and was now having to deal with life and the people around me. I had little faith in the AA solution and wanted to move on. I was also suffering from depression. I do feel that some of the methods that I learnt from NLP such as reframing situations and looking at where emotions were coming from, really helped. I found that I recognised when the emotions were building up quickly and was able to do something positive to deal with the situation and relax my mind by employing some simple techniques. These methods really helped me get through a difficult few months and I also discussed them with my counsellor and doctor who could then see what my triggers were and provide additional help. I have found that mindfulness actually helps me deal with these things today, but that was not an instant solution and has taken several years practice to give me the really great benefits that I feel today.

I do think people do need to be careful when using NLP or any type of support group or self-help. Lets face it, if sorting people’s problems out were as easy as the originators of NLP claim, then all doctors in the mental health field would be out of work, and that is clearly not the case. I am always suspicious of any organisation that has a pyramid type structure such as NLP and AA, and always take a step back and try to see if what is being said will actually help me, or is simply some broad-based idea designed to make me attracted to the method being suggested.

I suppose in conclusion I would have to say that NLP was something that was helpful at a stage in my recovery, but not something that I use that often now and I have moved on to another stage which is more about general healthy living and simply getting on with life. I do occasionally listen to the recordings and have a couple by Paul McKenna and Glen Harold that help me unwind after work and aid a good nights sleep. I did find that the books by McKenna really did motivate me in a positive way, and that they are probably the reason that I took up physical exercise again a few years ago. That is something that has become really important to boosting my self-esteem and taking me away from the stress of work and other issues in life.

 

The post NLP in recovery from Alcoholism and Addiction appeared first on Recovering-from-Recovery.

]]>
https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/nlp-recovery-alcoholism-addiction/feed/ 5 9432
Mindfulness and self help https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/mindfulness/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=mindfulness https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/mindfulness/#respond Thu, 28 Aug 2014 08:50:18 +0000 https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/?p=9084 Mindfulness and Self Help as well as recovery from Alcohol and Addiction I was prompted to write this after reading a couple of articles in the Guardian,that criticised aspects of the way mindfulness is practiced and taught. Although I am a fan of mindfulness and related activities such as yoga, I feel they make some […]

The post Mindfulness and self help appeared first on Recovering-from-Recovery.

]]>
Mindfulness and Self Help as well as recovery from Alcohol and Addiction

I was prompted to write this after reading a couple of articles in the Guardian,that criticised aspects of the way mindfulness is practiced and taught. Although I am a fan of mindfulness and related activities such as yoga, I feel they make some valid points. http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/aug/06/mindfulness-is-self-help-nothing-to-change-unjust-world and this one http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/aug/25/mental-health-meditation

The pieces talk about mindfulness being a modern fad, that is not an answer to all our problems and this has produced some interesting comments. I have practiced mindfulness for some time before it became mainstream, but was actually introduced to it, via a NHS pain management doctor, who did know what they were doing. It was suggested it may help my partner and that I could try it to support her. She was not a fan of it, but I took to it straight away and feel it has made a difference to my life. I was not practicing this at the start of my recovery from alcoholism, but can see ways that it could help people who are.meditation

People such as Stanton Peele feel it is helpful and he used it as a core technique in his book Recover, which I think is a great book.I wrote about it here https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/recover-stop-thinking-addict-reclaim-life-perfect-program/ However it has now become something that is being pushed by every self-help guru, and that puts a lot of people off. I find the concept of bankers, trying to quiet their poor stressed minds with mindfulness as described in the article, rather amusing, and is certainly not really what meditation is all about.

While I feel self-help groups and methods have their place, there is a danger in all this. Many people who suffer from addiction have issues that should be dealt with by somebody who is skilled and who knows what to do when things go wrong. If you start thinking that mindfulness, combined with NLP etc, being taught by somebody who only took it up a few months ago is going to provide all the answers to your problems, then you are probably going to become unstuck. You can end up being as badly off as somebody who attends a cult type, anti medication, pray to a lightbulb, 12 Step group, such as the notorious “Visions”AA group.

Some of these self-help groups operate in a similar way to pyramid schemes, as more students quickly decide to become teachers. Add to the fact that many of the people who join these groups are similar to 12 step members, in that they have mental issues, and you can have a problem, especially when people become evangelical about a particular solution.

I am certainly not saying that self-help methods and mindfulness are a waste of time, far from it. I am saying that you need to really look at your problems and decide what the best approach is going to be and that often means, getting some professional help, and not simply joining some “church hall’ group and expecting life to suddenly become amazing.

Things like yoga and meditation can certainly help some people, and this really has been the case with myself. However, I also had a lot of help from my doctor, several counsellors and a psychiatrist, and not just relying on lay people. In fact much of the advice I was given by two out of my three AA sponsors was poor and inappropriate and could have caused me problems had I not chosen to ignore them. I saw several people suffer after being given poor advice, such as to go away and pray and not, go and get some professional help.

There is certainly a place for meditation in the modern world, and many people find it helps them. Just don’t expect miracles and do take responsibility to get proper treatment should any problems occur.

 

The post Mindfulness and self help appeared first on Recovering-from-Recovery.

]]>
https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/mindfulness/feed/ 0 9084
Kenneth Anderson Blog Talk radio https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/kenneth-anderson-blog-talk-radio/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=kenneth-anderson-blog-talk-radio https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/kenneth-anderson-blog-talk-radio/#comments Fri, 31 Jan 2014 17:51:50 +0000 https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/?p=8177 Kenneth Anderson Blog Talk radio I have listened to a few episodes of this show on Blog Talk radio which is an internet based broadcaster, that allows bloggers to broadcast to their followers over the internet. The shows are downloadable and also available as podcasts, if you are in a different timezone.  This show features […]

The post Kenneth Anderson Blog Talk radio appeared first on Recovering-from-Recovery.

]]>
Kenneth Anderson Blog Talk radio

I have listened to a few episodes of this show on Blog Talk radio which is an internet based broadcaster, that allows bloggers to broadcast to their followers over the internet. The shows are downloadable and also available as podcasts, if you are in a different timezone.  This show features Stanton Peele, who is one of the writers whose books really helped me when I was still craving drink. He has a new book out this week, that gives people tools to recover from addiction and which also uses mindfulness as one these methods. As this is one of the things that have helped me, I am interested to see what he has written. His other books such as the “Diseasing of America: How We Allowed Recovery Zealots and the Treatment Industry to Convince Us We Are Out of Control” still sell well and are available on Amazon.  http://www.amazon.com/Stanton-Peele/e/B000APH1ZW 

recover

His site about the book is here http://theperfectprogram.net/?p=7  and his blog is here http://lifeprocessprogram.com

Kenneth Anderson is the person who started the Hams network after he found AA to be completely unsuitable. You can find his blog here http://hamsnetwork.wordpress.com/author/porkchoptze/ and he also has this site here http://hamsnetworkorg which provides information on his recovery methods that many prefer to the old 12 step method.

This particular show starts off about neuroplasticity, genetics and the myths that many promote. They then move on to a good discussion as to why alternatives are needed to the 12 step model. They talk about how labelling yourself as an alcoholic creates a negative self-image, as well as throwing out the disease theory and powerlessness.  I must confess I am not that familiar with the HAMS method, but will look into it in the near future, as I have heard good things about it from other people. He certainly seems to make sense in the podcasts. Blog talk radio is a great way for people to broadcast from their blog and have people phone in. Monica Richardson does a great show on there as well and I will try to pick out some of my favourite episodes from her in the near future as well.

More Self Help Podcasts at Blog Talk Radio with Kenneth Anderson on BlogTalkRadio

 

 

 

The post Kenneth Anderson Blog Talk radio appeared first on Recovering-from-Recovery.

]]>
https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/kenneth-anderson-blog-talk-radio/feed/ 2 8177
Craving and disease theory https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/craving-disease-theory/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=craving-disease-theory https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/craving-disease-theory/#comments Thu, 23 Jan 2014 12:33:13 +0000 https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/?p=8140 Craving and disease theory As some of you know I am interested in mindfulness as a tool to help me keep my life in balance. After developing this interest and discovering that it helped, I became curious as to why it worked. I then started to read about neuroplasticity, which described how the brain changes […]

The post Craving and disease theory appeared first on Recovering-from-Recovery.

]]>
Craving and disease theory

As some of you know I am interested in mindfulness as a tool to help me keep my life in balance. After developing this interest and discovering that it helped, I became curious as to why it worked. I then started to read about neuroplasticity, which described how the brain changes with time as a result of learnt behaviour. At one time, people thought that you could not change the structure much after your teenage years, but this has been proven to be wrong. Mindfulness can really help change things in all sorts of ways, from helping stroke victims, pain management and for helping diminish cravings in addiction over time.

Skeleton on chair

Skeleton on chair

Many in the faith-based 12 step world would like us to believe that addiction is a disease, but I do not feel this is true. The brain will change as a result of feeling the “reward” of substance abuse, but this is not a disease. You are also not powerless to change, unless your brain has ceased to function! I feel the disease theory is one of the many things that has held back advances in recovery treatment. It is about time that it is challenged and thrown out so that solutions are used, that are suitable for the modern age. Many like to feel they have a disease, as it excuses their addiction in their eyes, but I feel taking complete responsibility for recovery and life is the answer.

Anyway, I keep an eye out for articles about this and came across  this one about a conference https://sites.google.com/site/thespiralalsorises/home

Yesterday I read this blog post which I feel is really good http://addiction-dirkh.blogspot.co.uk/2014/01/drug-craving-or-how-to-be-your-own.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+AddictionInbox+(Addiction+Inbox)

I feel it sums up how addicts are their own worst enemy, and explains why they react the way they do. (It does not say they have a spiritual illness!) and talks about how the brain is designed to change and why this is not a disease.

Here is a small section

“Proponents of the disease model argue that addiction changes the brain. And they’re right: it does. But the brain changes anyway, at every level, from gene expression, to cell density, to the size and shape of the cortex itself. Of course, neuroscientists who subscribe to the disease model must know that brains change over development. Their take on pathological brain change would have to be very specific in order to be convincing. For example, they would have to show that the kind (or extent or location) of brain change characteristic of addiction is nothing like that observed in normal learning and development. But this they cannot do. The kind of brain changes seen in addiction also show up when people take up rock collecting, fall in love, learn how to cook, or become obsessed with their appearance. The brain contains only a few major traffic routes for learning and goal seeking. And, like the main streets of a busy city, they are often under construction.  Brain disease may be a useful metaphor for how addiction seems, but it’s not a valid explanation for how it actually works.”
I really do feel it is worth taking the time to give mindfuless a go, as most people who practice it regularly tend to be very relaxed and centered and this really helps if you suffer from stress or cravings. If you have used substance abuse as a crutch, this can be a much more worthwhile alternative.

 

The post Craving and disease theory appeared first on Recovering-from-Recovery.

]]>
https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/craving-disease-theory/feed/ 4 8140
Meditation https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/meditation/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=meditation https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/meditation/#comments Mon, 20 Jan 2014 19:37:04 +0000 https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/?p=8132 I thought I would mention mindfulness again and how I find it works with recovery. I started doing it a few years ago, when my partner was introduced to it as part of a pain management course. I was encouraged to take part to support her. I had never really considered practicing meditation formally before. […]

The post Meditation appeared first on Recovering-from-Recovery.

]]>
I thought I would mention mindfulness again and how I find it works with recovery. I started doing it a few years ago, when my partner was introduced to it as part of a pain management course. I was encouraged to take part to support her. I had never really considered practicing meditation formally before. It is mentioned in the steps of AA, but is rarely talked about in meetings, which is a shame as it can really help, with some practice. I had read books where people who I admired, said they practice it, but it had not really appealed to me. I went into it with no real expectations, and just did what the teacher said, but felt something straight away, which surprised me. shrine in London

We started with simple breathing exercises, and then moved on to a body scan meditation. The idea is that you go all the way around your body with your mind while you are lying in a relaxed position. You are taught to examine bones or skin and other sensations, and then to imagine breathing into the part you are thinking about. My mind did wander at times, which happens to everyone at first but then it became easier. I became much more aware of joints that could do with loosening and also learnt to accept feelings such as the small amount of pain I have as a result of accidents in the past. I found the whole experience very interesting.

From this start I bought a few books and then started doing guided mediations,which really helped me to progress. I also did some classes which helped and went on to do some yoga as well after a while. There are various forms of meditation, but I still like mindfulness, as it is very simple and I can spend a few minutes doing it at work, simply sitting in a chair. I find this really helps me relax, and break away from the chaos and stress of work for a period, and when I return, I am able to concentrate better and have more energy.

There are certain sequences that you can do over a period of a few weeks when you start, which are aimed at relaxation. I found these really helped me. They included, doing the body scan which I mentioned earlier. This can also be good before going to sleep.

I had actually already given up drinking , when I began meditation, so I have never used it to help me give up, although many books talk about  doing this. It is a great way to bring peace to the mind and it would be good for looking at cravings. I wrote about a meditation recovery book ,”The Mindfulness Workbook for Addiction: A Guide to Coping with the Grief, Stress and Anger that Trigger Addictive Behaviors” which I thought was good here. https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/mindfulness-workbook-addiction/

Although I did not use to initially stop, I feel it has helped me to stay  stopped. It has had other positive effects on my life as well. I have become much more aware of how I deal with stress. This was always one of things I feel made me want to drink. I would get more and more stressed, not do anything about it and then feel justified in trying to blot the day out with drink when I could. The cycle would repeat over and over again. These days, things are different. I tend to realise when stress is affecting me and take a step back and look at it. Even the simple breathing exercises can give me the pause I need. I can look at where the stress is affecting me and by doing this I can stay much calmer. I do not tense up so often and even if I do, I tend to notice it pretty fast and then relax. This really helps, and I certainly don’t need to knock myself out at the end of the day!

Research has shown that people who practice mindfulness can use it to change paths in their brain over time, so old unhelpful, harmful reactions are replaced with better thought processes. I have come to terms with emotions and can now observe them. I tend not to get overcome by them anymore. I used to have some quite damaging, repetitive thoughts, some of which were brought up by going through the 12 step method, but they have faded. This was a major relief! I also find it easier to forgive people as I found ways of dealing with others with more compassion.

I would recommend it to most people. There are many books on the subject as well as web sites with audio downloads. there are quite a few new books coming out that are specific to mindfulness in recovery. Stanton Peele has a new one which he has written with Ilse Thompson and I remember talking to her about it when the stinkin thinkin site was in full swing. I look forward to reading it next month when it comes out, although I will have to wait a bit longer than most as the release date is a bit later in the UK.

The publisher got in touch and asked me to write a review, which I will when I read it, she said – “I’m writing to tell you about our new book, Recover!: Stop Thinking Like an Addict and Reclaim Your Life with The PERFECT Program [TM], available on February 4th.  World-renowned addiction expert Dr. Stanton Peele provides treatments that break the cycle of addiction, empowering addicts to take back control and bring about the natural recovery process. Rejecting the “addiction-as-disease” model and AA’s twelve-step plan, Dr. Peele presents a method based on the PERFECT Program ™, combining evidence-based treatments with the practice of mediation.

Stanton Peele, PhD, JD, developed the highly effective Life Process Program for residential addiction treatment.  The recipient of several distinguished awards, Dr. Peele has had over one million copies of his books sold.

For more information about the book, please visit theperfectprogram.net and facebook.com/theperfectprogram.”

The people who run the “soberistas site” are also pushing meditation, as something that can help. People often put up some resistance when you mention it as an idea, to help in recovery, but for me it was one of the best things I have done. I would say I am much more positive about things and don’t waste time thinking about stuff that is unhelpful over and over again. If you go to a group you will meet people who are trying to make positive changes to their life, and who care about their health and wellbeing. It is rather different to the cigarette smokers and coffee swilling that happens outside an AA meeting and certainly more interesting!

Smart recovery also talk about the benefits of mindfulness, so it does seem to be gathering ground at the moment. It is great when a simple idea from the past can be adapted to help so many in the present. http://www.smartrecovery.org/resources/library/Articles_and_Essays/Rational_Thinking/mindfulness.htm

 

The post Meditation appeared first on Recovering-from-Recovery.

]]>
https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/meditation/feed/ 1 8132
The mindfulness workbook for addiction https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/mindfulness-workbook-addiction/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=mindfulness-workbook-addiction https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/mindfulness-workbook-addiction/#comments Sun, 05 Jan 2014 12:58:04 +0000 https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/?p=8023 The post The mindfulness workbook for addiction appeared first on Recovering-from-Recovery.

]]>

The Mindfulness Workbook for Addiction: A Guide to Coping with the Grief, Stress and Anger that Trigger Addictive Behaviors

If you have looked at the rest of the site you may have noticed I am a fan of mindfulness and have found it a good way to become more relaxed and centred during recovery. There are many books on mindfulness out there and I started meditating, with more general books rather than recovery specific mindfulness. This book is a great introduction and leads you through many techniques, that over time will help you to look at problems in a new more helpful way. It is aimed at those in recovery.

It is written in way that will reach those who do not use the 12 step model and those who do. It shows you how to take a step back from problems, as well as how to accept damaging thoughts about the past. These are the types of things that have really helped me. I used to have lots of intrusive thoughts from my subconscious, but they have faded with time.  I\’m am sure the many exercises in this book will help others do this.

Many people who are progressive thinkers about recovery have found the benefits of mindfulness. This book gives you a detailed guide to get started. It is often guilt or lack of self-esteem that drives people in recovery back to drink, and this book will help you with that. I like the way the book is layed out and how the reader is gently taken through different ways to meditate. it also has simple methods such as breathing exercises, which can help at times of stress.

You can buy it here

http://www.amazon.com/The-Mindfulness-Workbook-Addiction-Addictive/dp/1608823407

The mindfulness workbook for addiction

Editorial Reviews from Amazon site.

Review

The Mindfulness Workbook for Addiction is a brilliant blend of psychology and spirituality. Williams and Kraft have written a breakthrough manual, clearly and intelligently laid out, that blends the most current understanding of addiction with the powerful practices of mindfulness. One of the best books on living with integrity we have read in years.”

—Michele Hébert, author of The Tenth Door, and Mehrad Nazari, PhD, director of the Raja Yoga Institute

“What a gift! This wonderful workbook will help you understand how addictions function as a false remedy for negative feelings. It is packed with stories, metaphors, worksheets, and activities that will teach you how to befriend your mind and use it as a resource for recovery and fulfillment. The authors use everyday language to describe the complexities of the human condition, and help you systematically learn and practice skills to accept your feelings, live with integrity by honoring your values, and enrich your relationships. The workbook can be used by individuals or groups and will make a great adjunct for psychotherapy.”

—Heidi A. Zetzer, PhD, director of the Hosford Counseling & Psychological Services Clinic at the University of California, Santa Barbara

“Refreshing, unique, and practical. The Mindfulness Workbook for Addiction is an impressive synthesis of Eastern and Western techniques designed to help those struggling with addiction find a path towards healing and transformation. Through the use of mindfulness practices, cognitive-behavioral exercises, case examples and relevant metaphors, the authors entice readers to actively participate in their own recovery. This workbook offers creative, new ideas and practical recovery tools designed to facilitate real and lasting change. I can’t wait to use it with my clients!”

—Phylis Wakefield, PhD, psychologist, specialist in addiction and trauma and coauthor of Couple Therapy for Alcoholism

“With warmth and patience, The Mindfulness Workbook for Addiction guides the reader step-by-step through a journey toward self-understanding, self-acceptance, responsibility, and healing. With practical knowledge of how painful emotions drive us to act against our own well-being and how to free ourselves from this struggle, Williams and Kraft have provided an invaluable resource for people in recovery and the therapists who aid them. Mental health professionals are offered a comprehensive map of the emotional ground traveled in recovery from addictions and other self-defeating behaviors, with spot-on teaching stories that illustrate each stage of the process.”

—Laura E. Forsyth, PhD, supervisor of psychological counseling at Moorpark College and psychologist in private practice serving adults with ADHD, depression and anxiety in Camarillo, CA

“With an engaging and conversational tone, Williams and Kraft show you how to change the energy of addiction. Their practical strategies allow addictive personalities to dig deep and tackle the genesis of their destructive behaviors and trigger positive-mindset solutions for living a more powerful life.”

—Stacey Canfield, author of The Soul Sitter Handbook

“The Mindfulness Workbook for Addiction is a practical, easy-to-read book that addresses addictions of all varieties. The workbook is rich in offering tools and insights that everyone can benefit from, whether they struggle with an addiction or not. The authors nicely use case examples and metaphors to bring the concepts alive. This will be a valuable resource to anyone seeking to learn new skills for overcoming an addiction.”

—Lee Williams, PhD, professor of marital and family therapy at the University of San Diego and co-author of Essential Assessment Skills for Couple and Family Therapists

“Williams and Kraft teach readers in a clear, compassionate, and concise way how to observe painful feelings as they arise. By learning how to tolerate and investigate their present-moment experiences, readers can stop harmful behaviors and make more valued life choices. This guide will be an essential addition to the library of anyone struggling with addiction and difficult emotions, and for all therapists who want to utilize an effective approach to help people live fuller, healthier lives.”

—Shoshana Shea, PhD, clinical psychologist focusing on mindfulness-based cognitive therapy in San Diego

“The authors have created a tool that can benefit all people who are dealing with addictions. The Mindfulness Workbook for Addiction integrates our best treatments for addiction and the emotional suffering that comes with it. This is a clear, step-by-step approach that will help readers move from trying (and failing) to avoid pain to living the life that they want to live, consistent with their values and free from the substance to which they are addicted. The focus on a nonjudgmental stance and acceptance of one’s self while also facing challenges and changing behaviors provides readers with the key tools needed to change their lives.”

—John R. McQuaid, PhD, associate chief of mental health at San Francisco VA Medical Center, professor of clinical psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco and coauthor of Peaceful Mind

About the Author

Rebecca E. Williams, PhD, is an award-winning author and clinical psychologist specializing in recovery from mental illness and addictions. She received her master\’s degree from Harvard University and her PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is currently the clinic director of the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System\’s Wellness and Vocational Enrichment Clinic. In addition, she is an associate clinical professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego, an adjunct faculty member at the University of San Diego, and coauthor of Couple Therapy for Alcoholism. She has a psychotherapy practice in San Diego, CA.
Julie S. Kraft, LMFT, is an award-winning author.  She received her master\’s degree in marriage and family therapy from the University of San Diego\’s School of Leadership and Education Sciences. She has provided counseling to veterans and their family members at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System and has provided psychotherapy to individuals, couples, families, and groups in community settings. In her current position with Sharp HealthCare, she treats clients struggling with both addiction and mental health concerns. Julie has a private practice in San Diego, CA.

The post The mindfulness workbook for addiction appeared first on Recovering-from-Recovery.

]]>
https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/mindfulness-workbook-addiction/feed/ 4 8023
Soberistas https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/soberistas/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=soberistas https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/soberistas/#comments Mon, 30 Dec 2013 11:19:27 +0000 https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/?p=7959 Soberistas site. This is such a good site for people looking for support and is vastly superior to most non AA sites. It was set up by a lady in the UK for people who wanted to stop binge drinking. The site is here http://soberistas.com/ There are a good balance of people here. Some have been […]

The post Soberistas appeared first on Recovering-from-Recovery.

]]>
Soberistas site.

This is such a good site for people looking for support and is vastly superior to most non AA sites. It was set up by a lady in the UK for people who wanted to stop binge drinking. The site is here http://soberistas.com/

There are a good balance of people here. Some have been sober for a while, but many are in their first year. It is popular with people who are not fans of AA, although AA members are also welcome and do contribute. It does not have the pointless confrontation of some other sites and people treat each-other with respect. As a result, members can make good decisions about their own path in recovery. It is not one-sided, like many other forums. There is a chat room, which is going to be expanded in the near future and seems to be going all the time. The site has thousands of members, and seems to have grown in the last year, after mentions in the press and on TV.

I feel the site has a really positive message. There is a lot of talk on health issues such as food and is a safe place. It also has commenting from those in the counselling industry who give good advice. The site is UK-based, like this one, but has members from all over the world.

Here are some videos and radio.  https://plus.google.com/u/0/104306066071801899369/posts including a recent tonight show from the UK that features people from the site.

Here is a review from the Daily Mail http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2280441/Soberistas-How-mother-kicked-habit-wants-help-middle-aged-alcohol-addicts.html

The site has grown a lot since this was written.

There is also a soberistas wordpress blog http://soberistas.wordpress.com

It is worth signing up to wordpress even if you do not want to start a site just to use the reader. You can collect all your favourite blogs together and see when a new post come up.  Most people find my site this way, especially as it is new.

I am really glad that people are using the internet in this way and doing something new and innovative. It is great for people who are new to recovery to mix with others in a safe environment, and to see balanced discussion. I wish it had been around ten years ago! I understand they are going to do a big upgrade in the next few days.

 

 

The post Soberistas appeared first on Recovering-from-Recovery.

]]>
https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/soberistas/feed/ 1 7959