The Soberistas run

The Soberistas run

If you have looked at my site before you may have seen that I am a fan of the Soberistas site which is a community for people trying to live an alcohol free life. It is mainly for women but there are quite a few men there as well now, and the site has a lot of members. Many on the site believe in taking part in healthy activities and really turning your life around in many areas is the way to go rather than just stopping drinking and making that the focus of their lives.

 

A day after I wrote my little piece here on the advantages of running https://www.recoveringfromrecovery.com/dont-view-alcoholic-view-runner/ they announced a Soberistas run in February next year, so I feel that I should certainly take part. They have set various distances which you can walk or jog and three distances for more serious runners – 6,8 and 10 miles. I entered the 6 mile run which is about 10 kilometres which is a good distance for me. I normally try to run a few 5km and a 10 km each week and I can do this quite fast. I am getting on a bit and am mindful of my knee joints, so normally just run on grass and do not do massive distances. I can also run at a higher speed over 10k which I normally complete under 45 mins. Here is a link to the event http://soberistas.com/page/soberistas-run-series It will raise money for the British Liver trust so is for a good cause.

Soberistas Run

 

However I do feel that running a bit further and with more control may help so I am going to run some longer distances at a slower rate mixed in with some fast low distances along with other forms of exercise. At my age it is not possible to run 10 miles at the same speed I do 10 km. I have to pace myself and also drink water as I am running. I use the polar running app and heart monitor to help me keep pace and I am normally being told to slow down for the first half an hour or so. I tend to listen to music while I am running and it is tempting to run with the beat and go too fast.

 

My natural tendency is to have one speed, which is full on, but this is not the way to run longer distances. I have read quite a lot on the subject and find the training exercises in this Matt Roberts book really helpful. It is important to build things up over time and have some discipline. Cross training is also very useful. Anyway, there is plenty of time before February to decide what to do and I will either attempt a fast 6 mile or take a bit easier over the ten mile.

 

I do find having something to aim at in the future is useful. With running it is easy to get stuck in a rut and although I enjoy simply running round the park, I am sure that if I was a bit more focused, I would improve more. I am going to vary my distances over the next couple of months and also try some sprinting, to see how things work out.

 

It is similar to recovery in a way, where it is easy to just get to a place where you are doing ok, but not really progressing. I am aware of people with many years of alcohol free living, that are now trying new approaches and finding new answers as a result. Overall my life is so much better than when I was drinking, but there are things that I could improve. I have found that makin small adjustments to the way I am running and training in general will make a big difference in the long-term and this is probably true with other areas of my life and something I should look at more.

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  1. What great positive news! A very positive message.

  2. It is positive and I find the idea of a bunch of ex alcohol abusers have a race is a great idea as it really does promote the idea of moving from addiction to a healthy lifestyle.

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